T-Type wheels

Lesabre T-type or other H-body related topics.

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Josh
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T-Type wheels

Post by Josh » Thu Apr 07, 2005 4:54 am

Greetings all, I'm new here.

I have a 88 T Type, silver. The wheels on it, are starting to peel (the silver area, and I was wondering what others thought about I should do?

Should I go ahead and peal the laquer off, and buff out it, or should try to get them repainted?

Thoughts are greatly appreciated. Thanks.

HagensborgViking
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car:: 88 Lesabre T-type
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Post by HagensborgViking » Thu Apr 07, 2005 6:14 am

I've been fighting myself on this for a while now. We all know that the wheels make the car. I see these TTypes in the owners section with damn cool rims on 'em and I think I gotta go that route. But I really like the original rims with the black caps, and am tempted to get them redone. Most of my friends hate them because they're too 80's, but I think they look great when the whole car is done.

Anyways, I think I'm gonna keep the originals on there. I just got a quote to have them stripped and repainted for a bill a wheel. I might get some aftermarkets down the road when I'm rich and swap them now and then.

PS
It's probably gonna be pretty tough getting those rims looking good by yourself... Send them out.

88T-FL
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Post by 88T-FL » Thu Apr 07, 2005 12:14 pm

There is a procedure to refinish the factory wheels in the maintenance manual. I plan to do mine some day but just have not done it yet. Anyone here stripped/recoated theirs? Let us know how you do.

It is posted here:
viewtopic.php?t=2484&highlight=clear+coat

Thanks - Peter
88 BLT, 89 BLT, 89 BLT (Sold and missed), 86 LGN, 86LGN

viper_cole
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Post by viper_cole » Fri Apr 08, 2005 2:45 am

what procedure would i use to go about refinishing the plastic center caps on my 96 olds.. the center caps paint has flaked off and well looks butt ugly..
:stt: <=====> :btt2:
1986 Buick Lesabre Custom Crushed :cry:
1996 Oldsmoblie 88 LSS with Enkei 15's
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88T-FL
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Post by 88T-FL » Fri Apr 08, 2005 3:33 am

If you have paint flaking off the centers it is probably because someone painted them. I have two T-Types, one I am sure is factory and neither car nor the spare set I have are painted. If were going to restore them I would get a good buffing wheel - the bench mounted ones - and the proper buffing compund for plastic (think it is the white bar). They should buff up nice.

Thanks - Peter
88 BLT, 89 BLT, 89 BLT (Sold and missed), 86 LGN, 86LGN

viper_cole
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Post by viper_cole » Sat Apr 09, 2005 3:11 am

well its not on the T-type and it is the orginal color.. because it matches the rims and color of the car.. would i be better off buying new ones? or junkyard ones (whichever) or try and get these ones refinished?
:stt: <=====> :btt2:
1986 Buick Lesabre Custom Crushed :cry:
1996 Oldsmoblie 88 LSS with Enkei 15's
F*&K The New Model Cars We Ridin Ol' School
she says she's just a car I say she's just a girl.. its not just a hobby its a life style

86 2dr.ltd steve
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Post by 86 2dr.ltd steve » Mon Apr 11, 2005 4:54 am

Well "DONT TRY THIS AT HOME" but I did, then again Im good :P , had way too many years running a chainsaw hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, yearly, decadedly, and further more never had any sence of fear. So hand held powertools are nothing to me.

This is what I did to a set of Century T-type, turbine wheels (multispoke or whatever you would call them, nice wheels actually.

I had all the wheels off car already, sandblasted the centers (where the tire covers them up, between the beads) before mounting and had new tires mounted, balance weights are on the inside bead so they were not in the way. If you have them on outside of wheel remove them and have a rebalance afterwards.

First I filed any ding burs with a flat file.

Then jacked the front of the car up

Blocked rear wheels and E brake it

Lowered passenger side tire down on a 6X6 block so it would not spin

put jack stand under drivers side for safety

removed current wheel/tire and put one of the to be stripped wheels on car

got wife to operate shifter, and brake

do all of wheels on the drivers side front so you are close to your gear/brake operator.

put fine wire brush cup on my body grinder

make sure valve stem does not protrude beyond machined surface of the wheel. A few of mine were the longer stems and I used wire to bend them back and hold them. Not sure how to do this on LeSabre T wheel but Im sure I could figure it out.

Remone your black center caps

Had wife put car in 1st and let off break. NO gas please- gas = power, for faster wheel RPM I had her shift to 2 or 3rd but I forget now which gave optimum RPM for smooth workin conditions

Put safty glasses on your face Wire cups and wheels throw wires and they will stick, no children or audience watching either, Ive had to pull them things out of my legs, not bad, welding drip hurts more but they will stick you.

With grinder tiped on proper working edge (side of cup or wire wheel), it would take experience or some thinking to know which is proper working edge for direction of rotation. wrong edge and its going to catch and bounce, correct edge will ride over spinning surface so smooth you just wont believe.

With wheel spinning (slowly at first) turn grinder on and work in one smooth motion from outside of wheel to center as you see the aluminum start to shine.

It took me less than 1/2 hour to do all four wheels and the wire brush left a really nice machined look in the wheels too.

I actually started with one of those hand held wire brushes, it was one of those curved ones that seems like a new product to me, I never say them a few years back. Finally I said screw this, its taking too long but was riding smooth so I went and got bodygrinder and wire cup. I still used the hand brush to get into the V of the bead lip first, then with the power I got the final machined finish look.

I did not clear the wheels and from this winter I see they have a little of that oxidation started that aluminum will get from the weather and salt, they still look darn good though. I would recomend clear coat so they remain excellent for longer.

Viper Cole LSS centers - Wet sand them and repaint them with the correct factory paint code, its got to be on the option sticker, if not your local GM dealers parts man can find the paint code on his trusty computer. Mine just helped me out with some paint code issues I had with my 90 Regency. Those LSS wheels actually used a pretty nice silver matalic paint. Some epoxy primer might help paint grip the plastic better. Our are holding up well, still look near new. I plan on useing that code to paint the bumpers on my 76 because they are not worth rechromeing at this time anyhow. To many pits to fill, Ill just do them with filler and sand smooth, then paint with that color. It will have to do.
86 LeSabre Limited Coupe, 90 Regency FE3 conversion, 90 Ciera Cruiser SL, 97 L67 LSS, 75 Delta 88 Royale convertable

Josh
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Post by Josh » Mon Apr 11, 2005 2:48 pm

Wow determined.

Hmm, I'm still not sure what I'm going to do yet...
:stt:

Rocketguy
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Post by Rocketguy » Mon Apr 11, 2005 4:40 pm

viper_cole wrote:what procedure would i use to go about refinishing the plastic center caps on my 96 olds.. the center caps paint has flaked off and well looks butt ugly..
For the best results with the least amount of work, sandblasting it the ticket to refinish your center caps. Turn the pressure way down to about 30 or 40 PSI and CAREFULLY take the rest of the old paint off. Blast them until they are abraded evenly for a good "tooth" for the new paint. Then use a non sanding "adheasion primer", not a "primer surfacer". Products such as PPGs DP series primers or Duponts Corlar work best. After a short flash time just folow with the correct color top coat and your done. No scuffing, not sanding, just blast, prime, and paint.

Good things about catalized products like Corlar and DP:

HIgh quality. Last a good long time.

Superior Gloss

No sanding/scuffing at all, just set up and spray primer and paint.

Bad stuff about em'

Pretty toxic stuff.

No spray cans, gotta mix it and have a gun & compressor.

If you want to use a spray can, blast em' and prime em', then use a scotch brite pad to abraded them, and then follow with your top coat. there are several paint manufactures that have OEM colors in spray cans.

Bad stuff about spray cans:

Poor quality compared to catalized finishes. Does not hold up as well.

Gotta sand it when topcoat is desired.

If your going for a gloss finish, it wont be as shinny as a catalized paint finish.

Good stuff:

Cheap.

No mixing, gun, or compressor.

Not as toxic.

Best of luck :)
PPG Certified Automotive Paint Technician
'65 442, '66 Cutlass, '82 Corvette, '90 Touring Sedan, '87 "98" Coupe, '90 Regency FE-3, '91 "88" RB FE-3 Sedan, '90 "88" RB FE-3 Coupe,'91 "88" RB FE-3 Coupe

Rocketguy
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Post by Rocketguy » Mon Apr 11, 2005 4:49 pm

[quote="put jack stand under drivers side for safety.[/quote]


Kinda brings a whole new meaning to "Engine Turned Finish" doesn't it?

Did you let the suspension hang or did you put the stand under the A arm?

I heard that this would trash your CV joints if you spun the wheels like that with the suspension hanging.
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'65 442, '66 Cutlass, '82 Corvette, '90 Touring Sedan, '87 "98" Coupe, '90 Regency FE-3, '91 "88" RB FE-3 Sedan, '90 "88" RB FE-3 Coupe,'91 "88" RB FE-3 Coupe

86 2dr.ltd steve
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Post by 86 2dr.ltd steve » Tue Apr 12, 2005 3:21 am

Rocketguy wrote:[quote="put jack stand under drivers side for safety.

Kinda brings a whole new meaning to "Engine Turned Finish" doesn't it?

Did you let the suspension hang or did you put the stand under the A arm?

I heard that this would trash your CV joints if you spun the wheels like that with the suspension hanging.[/quote]

Good point, cant remember, no problems with CV joints, cant be worse than running at full lock really.

Im with you on the sandblast clean and prime and paint. Thats what I just did to the whole lower part of the 90 Regency plus core support, inner fenders and A pillor dog legs. I use epoxy, Nason gray on that but I also use the PPG black epoxy, might be DP I forget. I also just started useing etch primer on old pitted areas, like my truck frame and the pitted spots on the Regency that I left instead of welding new. Ill see how it holds up, problem with that etch primer is you have to go like hell and get the non sanding primer on, I think you have like 15 minutes, not much time when your crawling around a truck frame and floor pans.

The LSS has plastic center caps, would you feel safe blasting them? I suppose especially at 30-40 psi.

Those wheels came out great and it was a piece of cake job, I had tried sanding with fine wet paper, dry courser paper and it took to long and gave a dull grayish finish, then buffed and still duller finish. That Wire brush cuts and gives very brite finish.

Id do sets for people at a price but the shipping two ways would be over $100 unmounted.
86 LeSabre Limited Coupe, 90 Regency FE3 conversion, 90 Ciera Cruiser SL, 97 L67 LSS, 75 Delta 88 Royale convertable

Rocketguy
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Post by Rocketguy » Tue Apr 12, 2005 12:30 pm

Yes, sandblasting is what I would do, but with low pressure and CAUTION. I have done this with the tail lamp beezels, lenses, and other plastic parts and even chrome plated plastic parts with excellent results. If you use too much air pressure you can destroy your stuff though. The objective is to just remove the flaking paint and/or to get a nice even abraded surface to the paint will stick well. If you want to paint chrome finishes (plastic or any other), sandblasting is the only way to get a good rough surface on it so the paint will stick and not flake off. Sanding it just doesn't cut it, and it is too much work anyway.

Steve, have you got any pictures of those wheels?

The paint system your using is great! Nice high quality stuff. It should last a lot longer than the factory finish.

A note to priming sandblasted metal with pitting: If it is realy heavy pitting I have even brushed the initial coat on it to fill the pitts more effectively, but if you do that allow extra flash time before subsequent prime coats. And, sandblasted metal cannot get any cleaner, so don't use metal prep or touch sandblasted metal with anything, just get a good quality adheasion primer on it ASAP. The reason not to use any preping solution is because it is too hard to rinse out of the pitts and get it totally dry again before priming.
PPG Certified Automotive Paint Technician
'65 442, '66 Cutlass, '82 Corvette, '90 Touring Sedan, '87 "98" Coupe, '90 Regency FE-3, '91 "88" RB FE-3 Sedan, '90 "88" RB FE-3 Coupe,'91 "88" RB FE-3 Coupe

Tbird
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Post by Tbird » Thu Jun 30, 2005 1:09 pm

I had my stock rims done up last year. There is a place in Ontario that refinishes rims for $100 CDN each. They sandblast then machine them down. After they clearcoat and bake them. Looked awesome afterwards! Its been over a year and a half for summer driving and they still look great.
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1987 BLT :stt: rust free from Florida and restored with 77 kms / 48k miles.
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Post by MICHAEL MEYER » Thu Jun 30, 2005 6:42 pm

im thinking of having mine powder coated black - can anyone photoshop that so i could see what a black t-type would look like with all black wheels?
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Post by luvgm » Wed Aug 10, 2005 7:22 am

Go to www.eastwood.com they have all kinds of automotive supplies, including wheel polishing and refinishing supplies.
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